Category: Uncategorized

Episode #53 | Wandering and Eloping (Part 2)

Episode #53 | Wandering and Eloping (Part 2)

In this week’s episode, I was able to interview three amazing local first responders: 911 dispatcher Raegan Hays, Lt. Matt Cowles of the Spokane Police Department and Lt. John Goodman of the Spokane Fire Department.  John and Raegan are not only first responders, they are also parents of wandering children with autism. In this episode our first responders walk us through a call reporting an eloping child from the time the call is placed to the time a child is located and reunited with their family. Lt. Matt Cowles also lets us know how and when CPS becomes involved.

Episode #49 | Descalation Strategies with Jeff Kalles (Lilac City Behavioral Services)

Episode #49 | Descalation Strategies with Jeff Kalles (Lilac City Behavioral Services)

Ever wonder why things seem to escalate so quickly at home right now? With routines and structure changing so radically during our Stay Home, Stay Safe order, I asked my friend Jeff Kalles (BCBA) from Lilac City Behavioral Services to join me to discuss some general concepts that might help parents navigate escalation at home.

You can find Jeff Kalles at Lilac City Behavioral Services. His clinic is located on the north side of Spokane at 318 E. Rowan Avenue. If you are interested in getting on LCBS’s wait list for ABA services, please click here.

If you enjoyed this podcast, check out our LIVE @ Lunch interview that Jeff Kalles on YouTube.

Episode #24 | What advice would you give a new parent or your younger self?

Episode #24 | What advice would you give a new parent or your younger self?

Two common sayings you might here me say are: hindsight is 20/20 and wisdom is wasted on the old.  There are so many times that I have looked back at a moment or phase in my life wishing that I could change my response to a situation or that I could somehow share some of my current wisdom with my younger self. In this podcast a group of parents joined me to share some advice and words of wisdom that they hope might help other parents along their autism journey.

Episode #23 | Perspectives Over Time

Episode #23 | Perspectives Over Time

In this weeks podcast, I was very fortunate to have an autism mom veteran join me.  Clara’s daughter Sophie, now in he early twenties, was diagnosed in a time when there were very little knowledge and resources available to families.  It’s moms like Clara that helped pave the way for better services and inclusion for the younger generation of children diagnosed with ASD.   In this podcast you will learn about her journey and advice she wish she would have had when Sophie was younger.

Episode #18 | Sleep Issues

Episode #18 | Sleep Issues

I don’t know about you, but I’ll do just about anything to get a decent night of sleep.  In this episode of ISAAC’s Autism in the Wild you’ll find that you’re not alone if you have unconventional strategies to encourage sleep as well as hear more about:

  • How anxiety effects sleep
  • The pros and cons of Melatonin
  • Discussion of prescription sleep aids
  • School conflict regarding missing school or arriving late
  • Pros and Cons to strict sleep routines
  • Possible sleep triggers you may not have thought about
  • Successful sleep strategies
Episode #14 | Strategies for Picky Eaters

Episode #14 | Strategies for Picky Eaters

This is one of my favorite podcast recordings so far.  In this laugh-out-loud episode, a group of autism parents joined me to commiserate about the challenges of  having a picky eater. We shared a variety of stories and strategies such as:

  • The ‘wonderful’ advice people have given us over the years about correcting picky eater behaviors.
  • Successful strategies for expanding the diets of picky eaters
  • What not to do when you have a picky eater
  • How to handle advise from those well-meaning friends and family members.
  • Parent guilt for accommodating strong food preferences
  • How picky eaters effect the dynamic with other children at home.

If you listen to the end, I shared a recent account of my last family dining debacle in at Denny’s.

Episode #10 | AAC Speech Output Devices for Communication

Episode #10 | AAC Speech Output Devices for Communication

My special guest this week is Lauren Swineford, research professor at Washington State University. Dr. Laurie (as we like to call her) is a speech-language pathologist and assistant professor at Washington State University. She earned her PhD at Florida State University and completed her post-doctoral training in the Pediatric and Developmental Neuroscience Branch at the National Institute of Health. She has conducted extensive, longitudinal studies with children with ASD and her clinical and research interests involve the prelinguistic and language development for individuals with ASD.

Dr. Laurie and I dived into the confusing world of AAC communication and what this means for our kids with language disorders.  You’ll learn:

  • What exactly AAC stands for.
  • Why AAC is such a hot topic.
  • The difference between “unaided” systems vs. “aided” systems.
  • Deep discussion on the messy state of research with regard to effectiveness of AAC (specifically with regard to technology based communication programs.)
  • Importance of early intervention and emphasis on functional use of spontaneous communication.
  • Discussion of the National Autism Center report (2015) that evaluated the state of treatment research for individuals with autism and it’s assessment of AAC.
  • Recommendations to parents for what to look for when seeking an AAC assessment.
  • Myths about who would benefit from AAC.
  • Takeaways recommendations for parents on how to view AAC.

***The second half of this podcast is dedicated to specific information regarding Dr. Laurie’s current research projects at WSU. Families with young children starting as early as 9 months of age (with and without concerns of ASD) can be part of her program to help further research on language development in young children. The second project focuses on developing a screen process for assessing language in young children, once it it is present.  This program is for children ages 2 to 12 years of age.

This post will be updated with contact information for research program participation as soon as it is available.